Forest
Forest was Commended by Security Council Resolution # 219

WA Delegate (non-executive): The Old Growth Forests of Ruinenlust (elected )

Founder: The Cool Temperate Rainforests of Errinundera

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Most World Assembly Endorsements: 25th Most Nations: 30th Most Influential: 165th+11
Most Valuable International Artwork: 458th Best Weather: 1,017th Most Rebellious Youth: 1,155th Most Beautiful Environments: 1,205th Largest Black Market: 1,319th Most Eco-Friendly Governments: 1,472nd Nicest Citizens: 1,526th Most Compassionate Citizens: 1,577th Most Cultured: 1,692nd Most Inclusive: 1,755th Smartest Citizens: 2,370th
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  1. 7

    Government Transparency Report #9 - Oct 2020

    MetaGameplay by Verdant Haven . 93 reads.

  2. 6

    Forest's Research & Statistics Grove

    MetaReference by Kawastyselir . 329 reads.

  3. 33

    Maps of Forest

    MetaReference by Octopus Islands . 2,381 reads.

  4. 8

    Want to be an Ambassador?

    MetaGameplay by Verdant Haven . 256 reads.

  5. 13

    An announcement regarding the delegacy

    MetaGameplay by Verdant Haven . 174 reads.

  6. 6

    The Cabinets of Forest

    MetaReference by Kawastyselir . 111 reads.

  7. 43

    THE OFFICIAL FOREST RECIPE LIST

    MetaReference by Palos Heights . 500 reads.

  8. 16

    Forest Directory

    MetaReference by Mount Seymour . 1,119 reads.

  9. 35

    Constitution of Forest

    MetaReference by Mount Seymour . 2,430 reads.

  10. 48

    Forest Regional History

    MetaReference by Mozworld . 1,883 reads.

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Embassies: Philosophy 115, Eladen, Hippy Haven, Yggdrasil, International Democratic Union, Antarctica, Winterfell, Sunalaya, Antarctic Oasis, Texas, Canada, A Liberal Haven, Union of Free Nations, Singapore, The Region That Has No Big Banks, Democratic Socialist Assembly, and 20 others.the Rejected Realms, The Bar on the corner of every region, the South Pacific, Oatland, Haiku, Portugal, 10000 Islands, Spiritus, Conch Kingdom, The North Pacific, The Leftist Assembly, Europe, Sonindia, Wintreath, Osiris, Refugia, The Union of Democratic States, Thalassia, New West Indies, and Force.

Tags: Casual, Commended, Democratic, Eco-Friendly, Featured, Gargantuan, Issues Player, Map, Multi-Species, Offsite Chat, Pacifist, Regional Government, and 2 others.Social, and World Assembly.

Regional Power: Extremely High

Forest contains 599 nations, the 30th most in the world.

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Today's World Census Report

The Most Beautiful Environments in Forest

World Census researchers spent many arduous weeks lying on beaches and trekking through rainforests to compile a definitive list of the most attractive and best cared for environments.

As a region, Forest is ranked 1,205th in the world for Most Beautiful Environments.

NationWA CategoryMotto
1.The Eco-Republic of MozworldDemocratic Socialists“Dream not of today”
2.The United Mangrove Archipelago of RansiumDemocratic Socialists“Semper Virens”
3.The CUP-Eladeni Isocracy of Liberal LiberalsLeft-wing Utopia“Can't we all just get along? Eladen Rep”
4.The Colony of ChilledsvilleAuthoritarian Democracy“Smile! It's not that bad!”
5.The Kingdom of ReanniaDemocratic Socialists“Not All Those Who Wander Are Lost.”
6.The Cool Temperate Rainforests of ErrinunderaCivil Rights Lovefest“Please leave meat, leather, guns & cars in bin provided”
7.The Utopian People's Republic of Love and NatureLiberal Democratic Socialists“We are part of nature, we are the vessels of love”
8.The Webcomic RolePlaying Game of Darths and DroidsDemocratic Socialists“Jar Jar, you're a genius!”
9.The Second Green Republic of Uan aa BoaDemocratic Socialists“The second best time to plant a tree is today”
10.The Emerald Forest of EryndlyndCivil Rights Lovefest“Before grace, subsistence. Before nobility, survival.”
1234. . .5960»

Last poll: “Shall Forest open embassies with The Region of Gargery? ”

Regional Happenings

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Forest Regional Message Board

Messages from regional members are co-ordinated here.

LodgedFromMessages
The Democratic Island Federation of Frieden-und Freudenland

Love and Nature wrote:I think this is a great example how so many of us has lost touch with the nature and "real world". It's after all just a little mouse. And I'm not trying to be sarcastic or anything nor point finger, just thinking out loud. Generation by generation we become more alienated from the nature.

Edit: And I just learned musophobia is one of the most common specific phobias. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fear_of_mice_and_rats

Uan aa Boa wrote:I see what you're saying, and personally when it's happened to me having mice around the house hasn't bothered me, but it clearly causes distress to FuF on a visceral, instinctive level. The way some people freak out around spiders might also suggest a disconnect from nature (if you're not in the tropics what are they going to do to you anyway?) but that's no comfort to the person having that reaction. A colleague of mine grew up and still lives on a farm so she's not squeamish or unfamiliar with the animal kingdom, but at the first sign of any kind of rodent all you'll see of her is her back vanishing into the distance. I have things I'm uncomfortable with that seem inexplicable to others - maybe you do too. Do we have any compelling reason to think these reactions happened less in the past?

I kinda agree with you both.

Some fears, for example the fear of snakes, are thought to be instinctual in primates. They were dangerous to us throughout the course of evolution, and we have come to develop a natural, often irrepressible disgust to and fear of them; and this kneejerk reaction is meant to keep us alive. Take a chimp that has never seen a snake, expose them to one, and they will be unsettled.

I am not sure if the fear of mice has evolutionary origins like this, or whether it is mainly culturally conditioned. Anyone who knows a bit about history knows about how devastating the Black Death was, and that mice were the main vectors for the fleas that carried the plague bacterium. While plague is no longer a concern in many parts of the globe (incl. Eastern US), it is perhaps hard to shake off the deeply engrained knowledge of how dangerous mice and rats have been to us for a long time.

What Uan says perfectly captures how I feel. It is more or less a visceral reaction. It may not be a very rational fear, but most fears aren't anyway. It just makes me intensely uncomfortable.

The Most Serene Eco-Republic of Middle Barael

Verdant Haven wrote:Technically correct about the use of feline vs feild, but one must be careful with the term "big cat." That term includes cheetahs and cougars, neither of which are pantherines - both of those are actually genus Felinae!

As an aside, while "feline" vs "felid" is in this case a sub-family distinction, the "prefix-ine" terms aren't always that. "Leporine" means rabbit-like based on the family Leporidae. "Vulpine" means fox-like, derived from the tribe Vulpini. "Lupine" means wolf-related and "Leonine" means lion-related, with both terms deriving directly from a specific species term (C. lupus and P. leo respectively).

Basically, it all comes down to context. When using the term as a noun, such as in most scientific usage, the distinction between terms like feline vs felid is important. When using it as an adjective, like in the majority of daily or casual speech one hears, that distinction is neither intended nor relevant. It's basically a fancy way to say "cat-like" (or dog-like, fox-like, wolf-like, bear-like, etc).

Yeah I know that Cheetahs and Pumas are felines, I just didn’t realize that the term Big Cats included them.

And thanks for the tip with -ines, I had always thought that -one corresponded with -inae, which is the suffix for most subfamilies

The Incorporated States of Terrabod

Frieden-und Freudenland wrote:I am not sure if the fear of mice has evolutionary origins like this, or whether it is mainly culturally conditioned. Anyone who knows a bit about history knows about how devastating the Black Death was, and that mice were the main vectors for the fleas that carried the plague bacterium. While plague is no longer a concern in many parts of the globe (incl. Eastern US), it is perhaps hard to shake off the deeply engrained knowledge of how dangerous mice and rats have been to us for a long time.

The Black Death is actually know as the Second Plague Pandemic, with the so-called First Plague Pandemic lasting from 541-767CE (roughly 600 years before the Black Death). However, it's widely accepted that Yersinia pestis, the species of bacteria which causes the disease, has been infecting humans since prehistoric times. When you mention mice as the carriers of the flea vector, I think you're mixing that up with the idea that black rats spread the plague. This in itself is something of a misconception; while Y. pestis likely hitched a ride to Europe via black rats that stowed away on merchant ships, once it arrived onshore in Europe it was transmitted primarily by human fleas (which were rife because living conditions were so filthy) and person-to-person aerosol contact.

That's not to say that mice and rats aren't carriers of disease in a more general sense. I don't doubt that mice and rats have been transmitting diseases to humans since prehistoric times, and that could mean there is an evolutionary origin to the fear of rodents in the same way that our fear of the grotesque probably originates from prehistoric ideas of what 'healthy' and 'infectious' look like.

The Pacific Alpine Commonwealth of Mount Seymour

Frieden-und Freudenland wrote:Thank you. I will now have nightmares about this tonight.

Also, murine is a nice adjective. Not sure how often it will come handy, but it is useful to know. Putting it in the same compartment of my brain where I have fancy Latin adjectives like bovine, porcine, ursine, etc.

Erinaceous is, I think, my favorite adjective of that type.

Frieden-und Freudenland wrote:I kinda agree with you both.

Some fears, for example the fear of snakes, are thought to be instinctual in primates. They were dangerous to us throughout the course of evolution, and we have come to develop a natural, often irrepressible disgust to and fear of them; and this kneejerk reaction is meant to keep us alive. Take a chimp that has never seen a snake, expose them to one, and they will be unsettled.

I am not sure if the fear of mice has evolutionary origins like this, or whether it is mainly culturally conditioned. Anyone who knows a bit about history knows about how devastating the Black Death was, and that mice were the main vectors for the fleas that carried the plague bacterium. While plague is no longer a concern in many parts of the globe (incl. Eastern US), it is perhaps hard to shake off the deeply engrained knowledge of how dangerous mice and rats have been to us for a long time.

What Uan says perfectly captures how I feel. It is more or less a visceral reaction. It may not be a very rational fear, but most fears aren't anyway. It just makes me intensely uncomfortable.

There's certainly an element of cultural, or at least geographical, conditioning. Here in New England mice are pretty common, but there are zero lizards, nearly no large spiders, and not too many cockroaches. If someone from around here encountered one of those like you did with your mouse -- even if they were in another country -- they'd likely have the same reaction as you. Mice, on the other hand, are just "ugh, we've got some mice". But there's nothing inherently more dangerous about a lizard or a cockroach compared to a mouse. Just what we've gotten used to.

The Democratic Island Federation of Frieden-und Freudenland

Mount Seymour wrote:Erinaceous is, I think, my favorite adjective of that type.

There's certainly an element of cultural, or at least geographical, conditioning. Here in New England mice are pretty common, but there are zero lizards, nearly no large spiders, and not too many cockroaches. If someone from around here encountered one of those like you did with your mouse -- even if they were in another country -- they'd likely have the same reaction as you. Mice, on the other hand, are just "ugh, we've got some mice". But there's nothing inherently more dangerous about a lizard or a cockroach compared to a mouse. Just what we've gotten used to.

Yup, and that is certainly different for me. In Istanbul, we occasionally had issues with the so-called Oriental cockroaches. Disgusting, to be sure, but not as unsettling to me as mice are. A born-and-raised New Englander might find this reverse asymmetry baffling.

The Webcomic RolePlaying Game of Darths and Droids

Ruinenlust wrote:Wow, an Uan aa Boa, Palos Heights, and Darths and Droids post back-to-back-to-back! It's like old times. :-)

...old times? Am I considered part of the regional elite now? Hmmm... eh, I'll take it.

The Royal Isles of Shalotte

Darths and Droids wrote:...old times? Am I considered part of the regional elite now? Hmmm... eh, I'll take it.

Thank Hiort I keep CTE'ing, else people would keep calling me old too.

The Tsardom of Lura

Mount Seymour wrote:Erinaceous is, I think, my favorite adjective of that type.

There's certainly an element of cultural, or at least geographical, conditioning. Here in New England mice are pretty common, but there are zero lizards, nearly no large spiders, and not too many cockroaches. If someone from around here encountered one of those like you did with your mouse -- even if they were in another country -- they'd likely have the same reaction as you. Mice, on the other hand, are just "ugh, we've got some mice". But there's nothing inherently more dangerous about a lizard or a cockroach compared to a mouse. Just what we've gotten used to.

Where I live in Australia, I think I've seen a mouse maybe once in my entire life, and I'm pretty sure it was already dead too.

Spiders, on the other hand? Well summer has only just begun and they are driving me mad with how many there are even inside the house. I'm not really scared of them, but I still worry when I see one in certain places.

Lizards are uncommon but really chill creatures minding their own business, nearly always outside. Our dog attacked one once but sadly I couldn't get her away before its injuries got too bad.

The Rogue Nation of Dark Kreston

Guys. Yesterday I got on and we were talking about world assembly fraud and today we’re talking about Felinae
and stuff.

The Most Serene Eco-Republic of Middle Barael

Lura wrote:Where I live in Australia, I think I've seen a mouse maybe once in my entire life, and I'm pretty sure it was already dead too.

Spiders, on the other hand? Well summer has only just begun and they are driving me mad with how many there are even inside the house. I'm not really scared of them, but I still worry when I see one in certain places.

Lizards are uncommon but really chill creatures minding their own business, nearly always outside. Our dog attacked one once but sadly I couldn't get her away before its injuries got too bad.

Here in New Jersey we get a lot of Deer, Squirrels, Chipmunks, and even the occasional fox

Bugs-wise, we have a lot of spiders (though probably not as many as you), which I am deathly afraid of

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