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The Voluntarist Lands of Violan

Catos wrote:Why is it that whenever I read any anarchist theories they simultaneously make a lot of sense and no sense at all? Senpai I request assistance.

Yeah, I feel you. Here's the entry on the Merchant Law that goes into how it actually works: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lex_mercatoria

If you REALLY wanna go full-autism into this, here's a list of a bunch of resources, books, etc.: http://www.ozarkia.net/bill/anarchism/PolycentricLaw.html

In Violan's history, the Void Law basically came about in response to the burgeoning space travel since the then-republic's law wasn't very well-enforced and the actors there needed a good way to resolve disputes. Only later, with the republic's fall, did the Void Law migrate back to Violan itself and become the basis of its law system. If it's all too confusing to bother with, a good summation is "kritarchy"--rule by judges--and common law. Only the judges operate in a sort of market for their services rather than being appointed by some authority.

The Merchant Republic of Environmental Support

Violan wrote:Yeah, I feel you. Here's the entry on the Merchant Law that goes into how it actually works: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lex_mercatoria

If you REALLY wanna go full-autism into this, here's a list of a bunch of resources, books, etc.: http://www.ozarkia.net/bill/anarchism/PolycentricLaw.html

In Violan's history, the Void Law basically came about in response to the burgeoning space travel since the then-republic's law wasn't very well-enforced and the actors there needed a good way to resolve disputes. Only later, with the republic's fall, did the Void Law migrate back to Violan itself and become the basis of its law system. If it's all too confusing to bother with, a good summation is "kritarchy"--rule by judges--and common law. Only the judges operate in a sort of market for their services rather than being appointed by some authority.

Wack

The Voluntarist Lands of Violan

Environmental Support wrote:Wack

Yeah, well, your mother.



The Merchant Republic of Environmental Support

Violan wrote:Yeah, well, your mother.

I don't mean it in a disparaging way. Its an interesting application of the ideas of market forces to the judiciary

But it's still wild

The Solar Republic of Catos

Violan wrote:Yeah, I feel you. Here's the entry on the Merchant Law that goes into how it actually works: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lex_mercatoria

If you REALLY wanna go full-autism into this, here's a list of a bunch of resources, books, etc.: http://www.ozarkia.net/bill/anarchism/PolycentricLaw.html

In Violan's history, the Void Law basically came about in response to the burgeoning space travel since the then-republic's law wasn't very well-enforced and the actors there needed a good way to resolve disputes. Only later, with the republic's fall, did the Void Law migrate back to Violan itself and become the basis of its law system. If it's all too confusing to bother with, a good summation is "kritarchy"--rule by judges--and common law. Only the judges operate in a sort of market for their services rather than being appointed by some authority.

https://theihs.org/w91issues/

Pulled this from the ozarks reading list, felt it gave a good intro. Thanks for the links my guy. I'm somewhat skeptical, but also very intrigued ngl.



The Voluntarist Lands of Violan

Catos wrote:https://theihs.org/w91issues/

Pulled this from the ozarks reading list, felt it gave a good intro. Thanks for the links my guy. I'm somewhat skeptical, but also very intrigued ngl.

Skepticism is definitely the proper default response. I remember my first exposure to it I called Rothbard a crazy kook. Those words specifically. But the logic won me over eventually. We've been doing the whole state thing for centuries now, and it always corrupts horribly, spends wastefully, and makes a mockery of justice. I think it'd be a good idea to try and make a sort of small polycentric law society just to see if it works and if there's a good alternative to this mess.

Environmental Support wrote:I don't mean it in a disparaging way. Its an interesting application of the ideas of market forces to the judiciary

But it's still wild

No offense taken, don't worry. That "your mother" was meant entirely humorously. It definitely IS wild. But, as I said in the other one: we've been doing the same thing for ages with terrible results. Might be time to at least TRY something new in a small setting to see how it does.

The Solar Republic of Catos

Violan wrote:Skepticism is definitely the default response. I remember my first exposure to it I called Rothbard a crazy kook. Those words specifically. But the logic won me over eventually. We've been doing the whole state thing for centuries now, and it always corrupts horribly, spends wastefully, and makes a mockery of justice. I think it'd be a good idea to try and make a sort of small polycentric law society just to see if it works and if there's a good alternative to this mess.

No offense taken, don't worry. That "your mother" was meant entirely humorously. It definitely IS wild. But, as I said in the other one: we've been doing the same thing for ages with terrible results. Might be time to at least TRY something new in a small setting to see how it does.

Honestly I'd love to see real-world scenarios where these ideas are tested. Especially in a modern context, considering how laws need to deal with far more complicated problems than back in the middle ages. Not that our current system handles them brilliantly anyway (see: the U.S. Congress having a bill that would jail streamers for DMCA violations, the DMCA in general, taxing people with poverty level wages, etc.). The plenty of historical examples definitely turn this from "ancap tomfoolery" to something that's actually considerable. I'd need to read more on issues regarding multiple and/or conflicting jurisdictions, how people actually go about choosing law systems (cause it's a market now lol) and people who just flout the law regardless. I know the articles mentioned those issues but I'd like more detail. Basically I'm gonna end reading a book on Rothbardian kookery cause a ancap weeb gave me a reading list in a field I'm already interested in (law). So that's wonderful.

The Federal Republic of Meritorious Arcadia

The Beer Barony wrote:You say that taking freedom away in the name of "equality" is almost always the wrong choice. But again, back to me argument if there is a "Gay Panic Defense" but not a "Straight Panic Defense" it tips the balance of the law in favor of one individual over another. It creates a system of segregation and privilege. We are simply talking about leveling the playing field here so that no one gets a "Panic Defense". There are a lot of other, more logical and less selective by class, defenses still available to a person. Any Panic Defense should be defined that a person felt threatened by an individual who is threatening them with some form of harm. Not simply gunned down because they think a person is gay. It is ludicrious.

Also if equality is almost always a wrong choice are you saying you thought the Jim Crow laws of the 1960s were okay to pass, but that removing them in the name of equality was wrong?

Interesting. I suppose I should probably apologize for acting out as a psychology nerd. The reason I decided to poke at you a little was to see how youd react more than anything.

Please allow me to explain, your first few posts on the subject were predominantly emotion driven arguments where you were communicating little more than your anger at the situation than anything else. (ie. I find it reprehensible SHAME! and NO CONFIDENCE!) I hopped in after those posts to see how you would react to someone who was not swayed by that kind of argument.

To be clear, as I said in my first post, I dont know anything about this issue so Id have to do research on my own to actually establish a firm position. You make a fair case for your position but Id have to look into it more before I could actually make a firm choice. I feel like I should clarify what I meant when I said doing something in the name of equality was usually wrong because based on your response I did a poor job explaining.

All I meant by that is that a lot of politicians like using words like Health, Safety, Freedom and Equality to try to get people to support things. Because of that being a common manipulation tactic, Im suspicious whenever anyone says we have to do something for the sake of/in the name of equality/freedom/democracy/etc. (An example of what I mean is when FDR ordered the mass arrest of Japanese Americans so they could be put into the internment camps in the name of public safety because they could be loyal to the enemy.) Im not saying that equality cant be a good reason to make a choice or hold a position, Im only saying it sets off red flags for me when people try to use it as justification, especially when they dont give greater depth or explanation.

-

So setting aside the issue, I sided against you solely because of how you were presenting yourself to see if you would actually make a case for your position or just yell more (Im not trying to be mean or anything. Im looking at the tactics/arguments more than anything.)

The only point I truly had any interest in making was this:
The only person who can change someones mind is them.

With that being said, I believe that how you present yourself, your message or your side of things is often more influential than the content of your message.

To bring that into the current situation, if your first post had been something like: Im curious why you voted against this position. Personally I think it would better if we voted this way. I think this because... than that would be far more thought provoking and more likely to garner a positive/receptive response then yelling did.

Again Im not trying be mean, I just want to make the point clear that we cant actually change someone elses mind. We can provide more information and make arguments for or against a position but that will only have an effect if we do so in a way that inclines them to consider what we have to say. I think we all intuitively understand this to some extent but I think that actually putting it into words is important. To borrow an old saying: A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.

When we come out swinging in righteous anger, anyone who is neutral or undecided pulls back and wont pay much attention to anything we have to say.

The Parliamentary Monarchy of The Beer Barony

Meritorious Arcadia wrote:Interesting. I suppose I should probably apologize for acting out as a psychology nerd. The reason I decided to poke at you a little was to see how youd react more than anything.

Please allow me to explain, your first few posts on the subject were predominantly emotion driven arguments where you were communicating little more than your anger at the situation than anything else. (ie. I find it reprehensible SHAME! and NO CONFIDENCE!) I hopped in after those posts to see how you would react to someone who was not swayed by that kind of argument.

To be clear, as I said in my first post, I dont know anything about this issue so Id have to do research on my own to actually establish a firm position. You make a fair case for your position but Id have to look into it more before I could actually make a firm choice. I feel like I should clarify what I meant when I said doing something in the name of equality was usually wrong because based on your response I did a poor job explaining.

All I meant by that is that a lot of politicians like using words like Health, Safety, Freedom and Equality to try to get people to support things. Because of that being a common manipulation tactic, Im suspicious whenever anyone says we have to do something for the sake of/in the name of equality/freedom/democracy/etc. (An example of what I mean is when FDR ordered the mass arrest of Japanese Americans so they could be put into the internment camps in the name of public safety because they could be loyal to the enemy.) Im not saying that equality cant be a good reason to make a choice or hold a position, Im only saying it sets off red flags for me when people try to use it as justification, especially when they dont give greater depth or explanation.

-

So setting aside the issue, I sided against you solely because of how you were presenting yourself to see if you would actually make a case for your position or just yell more (Im not trying to be mean or anything. Im looking at the tactics/arguments more than anything.)

The only point I truly had any interest in making was this:
The only person who can change someones mind is them.

With that being said, I believe that how you present yourself, your message or your side of things is often more influential than the content of your message.

To bring that into the current situation, if your first post had been something like: Im curious why you voted against this position. Personally I think it would better if we voted this way. I think this because... than that would be far more thought provoking and more likely to garner a positive/receptive response then yelling did.

Again Im not trying be mean, I just want to make the point clear that we cant actually change someone elses mind. We can provide more information and make arguments for or against a position but that will only have an effect if we do so in a way that inclines them to consider what we have to say. I think we all intuitively understand this to some extent but I think that actually putting it into words is important. To borrow an old saying: A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.

When we come out swinging in righteous anger, anyone who is neutral or undecided pulls back and wont pay much attention to anything we have to say.

The emotional aspect that you talk about is a play on how British Parliment works. You kind of have to be blustery and pompeous to get heard on Parliment floor.

The Solar Republic of Catos

The Beer Barony wrote:The emotional aspect that you talk about is a play on how British Parliment works. You kind of have to be blustery and pompeous to get heard on Parliment floor.

It's what makes it so much fun to watch. Reality tv? Nah man, just tune into the House of Commons.

The Imperial Federation of Tamiy

Catos wrote:It's what makes it so much fun to watch. Reality tv? Nah man, just tune into the House of Commons.

And of course pull up a lounge chair and tune into the honorable respectable parliament of the wise, noble, and stoic Republic of China.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gmnZcQCGSQs

The Federal Republic of Meritorious Arcadia

The Beer Barony wrote:The emotional aspect that you talk about is a play on how British Parliment works. You kind of have to be blustery and pompeous to get heard on Parliment floor.

Hmm. Im alright with sarcasm and role playing but bad at interpreting both (at least in text.)

In the US its the exact opposite we just ignore the boisterous politicians but the ones that are calm and make a case for their position are the ones that actually stick out and get noticed 😅

The Merchant Republic of Environmental Support

Meritorious Arcadia wrote:Hmm. Im alright with sarcasm and role playing but bad at interpreting both (at least in text.)

In the US its the exact opposite we just ignore the boisterous politicians but the ones that are calm and make a case for their position are the ones that actually stick out and get noticed 😅

Sadly that's not entirely true. Many people give a lot of attention to the crazies, but at least our congressional meetings are relatively civil. I could pop on footage of parliament and it would be a better comedy than most sitcoms.

The Solar Republic of Catos

Tamiy wrote:And of course pull up a lounge chair and tune into the honorable respectable parliament of the wise, noble, and stoic Republic of China.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gmnZcQCGSQs

Taiwan knows how to do politics lol.

The Colony of Alpha Cen




| | Overview | |

A L P H AC E N T A U R I


Alpha Centauri, also known as Alpha Cen or A Centauri, is the sole colony of The Lunar Republic outside of its main star system. It is a trinary star system hosting multiple planets. The capital city, INNES, orbits the smallest and dimmest star in the system, Proxima Centauri. Only recently colonized by The Lunar Republic, Alpha Centauri consists mostly of research installations and manufacturing. The vast variety of untapped natural resources establishes the system as a growing industrial powerhouse in contrast to the galactic trade hub that is the rest of The Lunar Republic. Alpha Centauri does not come without controversy though. Founded during the pseudo-socialistic era of Lunar politics, many of those who now live there are descendants of those who were stationed there against their own will. In most sectors, the massive expenses of setting up and running the colonization process outway the potential economic gain. It is unclear yet if Alpha Centauri will remain in Lunar hands.

Read factbook

The United States of The Lunar Republic

FMF Pirate Radio pt. 2?

The Merchant Republic of Environmental Support

The Lunar Republic wrote:FMF Pirate Radio pt. 2?

If anyone would like to do it go ahead or if you want me to then give me a week or so and I should be able to whip something up



The Voluntarist Lands of Violan

The Lunar Republic wrote:FMF Pirate Radio pt. 2?

Oh damn, I forgot all about that. I was really tickled by the Catoni playlist. Rude (31st in the world, hilariously), independent, chaotic Violan being a nexus of punk and grunge music makes all too much sense.

Environmental Support wrote:If anyone would like to do it go ahead or if you want me to then give me a week or so and I should be able to whip something up

Would part 2 have the same nations or different ones? If the former, for Violan you could always focus on Outlaw culture or Violan's close ties with their AI citizens. Something synthetic or such? Ah, but feel free to ignore me. And thank you kindly if you do end up doing part 2.

"Do what thou wilt" shall be the whole of the law.

Outlaws are common topics of popular fiction. Pictured is a (rather fanciful) telling of the life of Gene Starwind, one of many famous outlaws.

Saint and sinner. Hero and villain. Space cowboy and rustler. Knight-errant and mercenary. Smuggler and liberator.

If there is anything that might be said to epitomize the Violanian culture, it is the outlaw. Though often viewed as heroic figures within the Voluntarist Lands, strictly speaking an outlaw is one who rejects the legitimacy of all laws besides the Void Law and acts to flaunt them. This can be as heroic as an outlaw freeing slaves from tyrannical nations and bringing them to freedom or as villainous as a sleazy drug-lord taking advantage of Violan's lack of drug laws to sell dangerous drugs on the black markets of other civilizations--or anywhere in-between. Their ethos is that of their own liberty and their only orders by their own dreams. Needless to say, they are interminable nuisances to just about every other star civilization with any degree of authoritarianism and have been the cause of more than one attempted (and foiled) invasion of Violanian space. After all, while a pirate will find no more sanctuary within Violan than he will elsewhere, an outlaw is free to cause his mischief and return to Violan in safety. Indeed, he is often seen as a culture hero and someone to be admired.

Worth particular note is the bond many outlaws share with AI due to the peculiarities of Violanian spacefaring technology (discussed later). Any nation that has strict AI laws is bound to see much activity from outlaws, who will act as smugglers and protectors for what they view as "kin" to their own AI comrades. This tendency was what sparked the most recent attempted incursion by outsiders into Violanian territory: the Drukos War or, more colloquially, Anne Kathaway's War.

A thousand other legends and battles stem from these figures, many of whom have passed into cultural legend. The average Violanian consumes their exploits with glee, glad that foreign "kings" (for all politicians are labeled "kings" by Violanians--a relic of their republican days) are made to feel the bite of a free man. There is, needless to say, no shortage of movies, books, games, etc. based on them as well. Though an outsider might meet a thousand Violanians and never see an outlaw in his life, he will likely always associate them with their rebellious adventurers.

Read factbook

Ghost in a Shell

Unlike many star-faring civilizations, Violan developed AI and space-travel technology not only in tandem but specifically designed together. A star pilot, whatever his skill, will still have some trouble adapting his reflexes to the incredibly high speeds accomplished in space, particularly as the speed of light approaches (leaving aside the problem of FTL travel). Violan's resolution to this common problem was simple, direct, and rather horrifying to many other spacefaring civilizations: include an AI partner to work with the pilot, augmenting his orders and incoming stimuli to achieve maximum efficiency. Originally, this AI was the ship itself, but it was not very long until these AIs began to express desires to move freely and as their human counterparts did. Androids quickly became the norm, and in the modern day every Violanian ship contains one or more android crewmember to act as the heart and mind of the vessel.

The social ramifications of this differ based on the size of the ship involved. For larger ships--battleships and the like--the many AI are merely another crewmember, treated as just another member of the militia or pirate-hunting company with their own specialist job. For smaller ships--and in particular for the fast corvettes outlaws favor--a single AI crewmember becomes a focal point, along with the captain/pilot, around which the crew revolves. The closer an AI and pilot grow--the more they intuitively know each other to their core and act in sync--the more efficient and deadly the ship as a whole becomes. Because of this dynamic, the closest relationship on any trading or outlaw vessel is often between the pilot and his AI. Much social drama has come of this, and of course many romances have as well--the most famous of which being the outlaw Gene Starwind and his AI Melfina.

Read factbook

The United States of The Lunar Republic

Violan wrote:Oh damn, I forgot all about that. I was really tickled by the Catoni playlist. Rude (31st in the world, hilariously), independent, chaotic Violan being a nexus of punk and grunge music makes all too much sense.

Would part 2 have the same nations or different ones? If the former, for Violan you could always focus on Outlaw culture or Violan's close ties with their AI citizens. Something synthetic or such? Ah, but feel free to ignore me. And thank you kindly if you do end up doing part 2.

I think music is a great way to tell how the people of a community are really feeling, rather than just taking what you get from governments and news. What you mentioned about the Catoni playlist particularly intrigues me. I feel that the music preference shifts I have in real life also reflect in how I see my nationstate. I've really been into punk rock lately, especially the Clash and late Soviet bands like Kino. I now see the Lunar Republic as more of a formerly corrupt authoritarian state with civil rights still trying to make a recovery, like the former Soviet Union; before I saw it as a futuristic, almost utopian society when I was listening to more recent artists like Travis Scott. I find it interesting that the songs I listen to and the stories behind them affect how I think about even the smallest things, like worldbuilding for a completely made-up city-state on a random website I happened to stumble upon one day.

The United States of The Lunar Republic

Violan wrote:
Ghost in a Shell

Unlike many star-faring civilizations, Violan developed AI and space-travel technology not only in tandem but specifically designed together. A star pilot, whatever his skill, will still have some trouble adapting his reflexes to the incredibly high speeds accomplished in space, particularly as the speed of light approaches (leaving aside the problem of FTL travel). Violan's resolution to this common problem was simple, direct, and rather horrifying to many other spacefaring civilizations: include an AI partner to work with the pilot, augmenting his orders and incoming stimuli to achieve maximum efficiency. Originally, this AI was the ship itself, but it was not very long until these AIs began to express desires to move freely and as their human counterparts did. Androids quickly became the norm, and in the modern day every Violanian ship contains one or more android crewmember to act as the heart and mind of the vessel.

The social ramifications of this differ based on the size of the ship involved. For larger ships--battleships and the like--the many AI are merely another crewmember, treated as just another member of the militia or pirate-hunting company with their own specialist job. For smaller ships--and in particular for the fast corvettes outlaws favor--a single AI crewmember becomes a focal point, along with the captain/pilot, around which the crew revolves. The closer an AI and pilot grow--the more they intuitively know each other to their core and act in sync--the more efficient and deadly the ship as a whole becomes. Because of this dynamic, the closest relationship on any trading or outlaw vessel is often between the pilot and his AI. Much social drama has come of this, and of course many romances have as well--the most famous of which being the outlaw Gene Starwind and his AI Melfina.

Read factbook

AI music is also pretty interesting. I definitely feel like a star-faring civilization with advanced enough technology would not stop at spaceflight with its AI development. Every detail of an individual's life would be determined by the AI, even songs. I think it would be interesting to hear what an AI would consider the "perfect song". Would it be the most catchy? The most interesting? Would it be something subliminal, yet crucial to increasing the efficiency of a workday? How would it achieve this? The perfect song could be so alien to us that we can't even comprehend it. It could be unlike anything we've ever heard, or it might even already exist.

The Merchant Republic of Environmental Support

Violan wrote:Oh damn, I forgot all about that. I was really tickled by the Catoni playlist. Rude (31st in the world, hilariously), independent, chaotic Violan being a nexus of punk and grunge music makes all too much sense.

Would part 2 have the same nations or different ones? If the former, for Violan you could always focus on Outlaw culture or Violan's close ties with their AI citizens. Something synthetic or such? Ah, but feel free to ignore me. And thank you kindly if you do end up doing part 2.

"Do what thou wilt" shall be the whole of the law.

Outlaws are common topics of popular fiction. Pictured is a (rather fanciful) telling of the life of Gene Starwind, one of many famous outlaws.

Saint and sinner. Hero and villain. Space cowboy and rustler. Knight-errant and mercenary. Smuggler and liberator.

If there is anything that might be said to epitomize the Violanian culture, it is the outlaw. Though often viewed as heroic figures within the Voluntarist Lands, strictly speaking an outlaw is one who rejects the legitimacy of all laws besides the Void Law and acts to flaunt them. This can be as heroic as an outlaw freeing slaves from tyrannical nations and bringing them to freedom or as villainous as a sleazy drug-lord taking advantage of Violan's lack of drug laws to sell dangerous drugs on the black markets of other civilizations--or anywhere in-between. Their ethos is that of their own liberty and their only orders by their own dreams. Needless to say, they are interminable nuisances to just about every other star civilization with any degree of authoritarianism and have been the cause of more than one attempted (and foiled) invasion of Violanian space. After all, while a pirate will find no more sanctuary within Violan than he will elsewhere, an outlaw is free to cause his mischief and return to Violan in safety. Indeed, he is often seen as a culture hero and someone to be admired.

Worth particular note is the bond many outlaws share with AI due to the peculiarities of Violanian spacefaring technology (discussed later). Any nation that has strict AI laws is bound to see much activity from outlaws, who will act as smugglers and protectors for what they view as "kin" to their own AI comrades. This tendency was what sparked the most recent attempted incursion by outsiders into Violanian territory: the Drukos War or, more colloquially, Anne Kathaway's War.

A thousand other legends and battles stem from these figures, many of whom have passed into cultural legend. The average Violanian consumes their exploits with glee, glad that foreign "kings" (for all politicians are labeled "kings" by Violanians--a relic of their republican days) are made to feel the bite of a free man. There is, needless to say, no shortage of movies, books, games, etc. based on them as well. Though an outsider might meet a thousand Violanians and never see an outlaw in his life, he will likely always associate them with their rebellious adventurers.

Read factbook

Ghost in a Shell

Unlike many star-faring civilizations, Violan developed AI and space-travel technology not only in tandem but specifically designed together. A star pilot, whatever his skill, will still have some trouble adapting his reflexes to the incredibly high speeds accomplished in space, particularly as the speed of light approaches (leaving aside the problem of FTL travel). Violan's resolution to this common problem was simple, direct, and rather horrifying to many other spacefaring civilizations: include an AI partner to work with the pilot, augmenting his orders and incoming stimuli to achieve maximum efficiency. Originally, this AI was the ship itself, but it was not very long until these AIs began to express desires to move freely and as their human counterparts did. Androids quickly became the norm, and in the modern day every Violanian ship contains one or more android crewmember to act as the heart and mind of the vessel.

The social ramifications of this differ based on the size of the ship involved. For larger ships--battleships and the like--the many AI are merely another crewmember, treated as just another member of the militia or pirate-hunting company with their own specialist job. For smaller ships--and in particular for the fast corvettes outlaws favor--a single AI crewmember becomes a focal point, along with the captain/pilot, around which the crew revolves. The closer an AI and pilot grow--the more they intuitively know each other to their core and act in sync--the more efficient and deadly the ship as a whole becomes. Because of this dynamic, the closest relationship on any trading or outlaw vessel is often between the pilot and his AI. Much social drama has come of this, and of course many romances have as well--the most famous of which being the outlaw Gene Starwind and his AI Melfina.

Read factbook

I'd probably be making it about nations not addressed in the last batch but we'll see

The Voluntarist Lands of Violan

Environmental Support wrote:I'd probably be making it about nations not addressed in the last batch but we'll see

That'd be for the best, I think. Best not to leave anyone out if possible!

The Lunar Republic wrote:AI music is also pretty interesting. I definitely feel like a star-faring civilization with advanced enough technology would not stop at spaceflight with its AI development. Every detail of an individual's life would be determined by the AI, even songs. I think it would be interesting to hear what an AI would consider the "perfect song". Would it be the most catchy? The most interesting? Would it be something subliminal, yet crucial to increasing the efficiency of a workday? How would it achieve this? The perfect song could be so alien to us that we can't even comprehend it. It could be unlike anything we've ever heard, or it might even already exist.

Listen, I think we all know that "We Are Number One" is the perfect song. ;)

The Merchant Republic of Environmental Support

Howdy everyone, I've added a new playlist to the FMF pirate radio. It's not on the official factbook page but it will be there soon.

https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1gx2smfF17NQd17enEkOl2?si=YwDsly0VSTO3M--14GQJ1w&utm_source=copy-link



The United States of The Lunar Republic

Environmental Support wrote:Howdy everyone, I've added a new playlist to the FMF pirate radio. It's not on the official factbook page but it will be there soon.
https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1gx2smfF17NQd17enEkOl2?si=YwDsly0VSTO3M--14GQJ1w&utm_source=copy-link

Great mix!

The Imperial Federation of Tamiy

@ Everyone not to brag or anything but it appears by overwhelming majority the people have cast their vote and declared me anonymously not only the best nation in the FMF but Supreme chancellor of this realm, some of you my old friends may perish in the ensuing purge of the old republic but that is a sacrifice I am willing to make.

*applause sign turns on*

(camera pans to the left)

-an unknown voice from a dimly lit corner of the senate room
*cough*
"So this is how liberty dies with thunderous applause"

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