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DispatchFactbookHistory

by The Republic of Martenyika. . 21 reads.

Martenyika in the Imperial War (WIP)

March to War (1940-1943)


Leading up to Martenyika's entry into the Imperial War, the Háloptí Peninsula remained under the control of the Íszkárí Confederation, administered by modern day Razzgriz. The Confederation valued neutrality in the conflict, however Martenyika had long desired to unify the peninsula and city under its banner. Martenyika brought this grievance to the secret December 25th, 1940 meeting in Athara Magarat known as the "Christmas Deal." The Christmas Deal irrevocably put Martenyika on the path to war.

Although the Martenyikan armed forces were not in the best overall condition at the time of the Christmas Deal, they had been undergoing gradual modernization efforts for well over a year. King Nyassa's Military Modernization and Growth Plan (MMGP) of 1939 was supposed to take until 1945, much later than when Martenyika would enter hostilities historically. However the Christmas Deal and the second MMGP of 1941 both accelerated this timeline greatly.

King Nyassa initiated the Second MMGP in January 1941 following December's Christmas Deal. The 1941 plan proved to be far more ambitious than its comparatively modest 1939 predecessor, with a greater emphasis placed on modern doctrines and heavy equipment like armor. In 1941 the king sent cadres of military officers to observe Neo-Imperialist armed forces, and sought out deals for weaponry of all kinds. The government also quietly set up a program for Martenyikans to enlist in Neo-Imperialist militaries, with the intention of building up a base of experience in 1940s warfare.
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On Land


Light anti-tank guns in the 37-50 mm range were relatively widespread amongst Martenyikan forces in the conflict, despite attempts to replace them with heavier guns commensurate with 1943-44 standards. Even though they remained effective against armored cars, light tanks, trucks, and light vehicles at range, as well as some enemy emplacements, they struggled to penetrate the armor of heavier tanks. On the other hand certain units within the Army such as the mountaineers were able to use them to great effect thanks to their relatively light weight and maneuverability.

[possible account of an action where mountain troops got light AT guns into or over unexpected terrain, and used them to effect in a surprise attack/ambush]
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On Sea



Martenyikan destroyers such as the River class destroyer Kombisse (pictured) served in a variety of combat and support roles from 1943 onwards. Armed with 5x 4.7"/120 mm guns and 2x triple 21"/533 mm torpedo launchers, and up to 50 mines, Kombisse and her sister ships posed a formidable threat to enemy surface vessels. Although her complement of anti-air weaponry was lacking at the time of her combat debut, she did receive AA armament upgrades throughout the conflict. Martenyikan destroyers, including the Kombisse, fought in surface actions, transported personnel and supplies, hunted submarines, and laid both offensive and defensive minefields.
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In the Air


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