9

DispatchAccountOther

by The Big Boi of The Poland-Lithuania Commonwealth. . 80 reads.

Constitution of Poland-Lithuania

Article I: Name of the Nation

1.1 The official name of the nation will be The Kingdom and Grand Duchy of The Poland-Lithuania Commonwealth.
1.2 The Kingdom and Grand Duchy of The Poland-Lithuania Commonwealth may be referred to by the acronym PLC.

Article II: Citizenship

2.1 Citizenship of The Kingdom and Grand Duchy of The Poland-Lithuania Commonwealth is open to all persons, no matter their age, wealth, religion, sex, sexual orientation, race, or nation of origin.
2.2 Each citizen shall be afforded the following rights through citizenship in The Kingdom and Grand Duchy of The Poland-Lithuania Commonwealth:

2.3 Each citizen shall possess the following responsibilities relative to citizenship in The Kingdom and Grand Duchy of The Poland-Lithuania Commonwealth:

2.4 The Kingdom and Grand Duchy of The Poland-Lithuania Commonwealth values and respects the personal information of its citizens. The Kingdom and Grand Duchy of The Poland-Lithuania Commonwealth will secure its citizens' information at all times and will not supply confidential information to third-parties.
2.5 The Kingdom and Grand Duchy of The Poland-Lithuania Commonwealth will protect the privacy of citizen information and must use it only for the delivery of service and not for commercial gain.

Article III: Government

3.1 The executives of the nation shall include the Monarch, Grand Duke/Duchess, Prime Minister, Deputy Prime Minister, President, and Vice President.
3.2 The broad responsibilities of each executive position are as follows:

3.3 Only persons who have been citizens of The Kingdom and Grand Duchy of The Poland-Lithuania Commonwealth for a time greater than or equal to 7 years may hold executive positions, unless the executive position is Monarch or Grand Duke/Duchess
3.4 The executive positions collectively will form the Privy Council that acts as the primary steward of the Government.
3.5 This Privy Council is collectively responsible for the day-to-day decision making of the Government including but not limited to monitoring finances, citizen services, and advocating on behalf of citizens.
3.6 This Privy Council cannot make amendments to the constitution without the approval of the Parliament at a valid general meeting.
3.7 The term of Prime Minister, Deputy Prime Minister, President, and Vice President will last for a time equal to or less than 5 years, wherein an election must take place.
3.8 Any executive of the Government may resign, provided that such resignation is made in writing and delivered to the Parliament. Unless any such resignation is, by its terms, effective on a later date, it shall be effective on delivery to the Parliament, and no ratification by the Government shall be required to make the resignation official.
3.9 Any vacancy of executives shall be filled by the Prime Minister or designate of the Government until such a time where a by-election is held.
3.10 If the Prime Minister resigns, a notice of such resignation must be submitted in writing and delivered to the Privy Council at a valid executive meeting. Unless any such resignation is, by its terms, effective on a later date, it shall be effective on delivery to the Privy Council, and no ratification by the Government shall be required to make the resignation official.
3.11 Any vacancy of the Prime Minister shall be filled by another Privy Council member appointed by a simple and clear majority of the Privy Council until such a time where a by-election is held.

Article IV: Elections and Voting

4.1 Citizens over the age of 18, or Permanente Residents who have lived in The Kingdom and Grand Duchy of The Poland-Lithuania Commonwealth for a length of time greater than or equal to 9 years and who are over the age of 18, may vote for a Member of Parliament to represent them in their constituency, and are hereafter referred to as Constituents.
4.2 Each constituent is entitled to one vote, which they may not be robbed of for any reason.
4.3 Constituents are forbidden from selling or buying votes.
4.4 Elections are to be held on 1 July every five years.
4.5 Only constituents are able to run for Member of Parliament
4.6 A constituent intending to run as an independent must announce their intentions at least 35 days before the election takes place.
4.7 A constituent intending to run under the banner of an established political organisation must openly announce their political affiliation in their constituency at least 60 days before the election, then again at 32 days before the election, and once more 10 days before the election.
4.8 In the case that more than one constituent intends to run in a constituency under the same political organisation, the political organisation has the responsibility of choosing the constituent they wish to have represent them.
4.9 Successful candidates will be required to give a short speech at a polling station where the election is being held. Each speech will be followed by a short question and answer period.
4.10 Elections shall be conducted by secret ballot, and overseen by an election oversight committee.
4.11 Successful candidates will be determined by the accrual of the most number of valid votes from constituents in that constituency.
4.12 Final results of the election must be presented to the citizens for ratification of the process only. The results themselves should not be brought into question; only the process through which these results were tabulated.
4.13 If an error in the process is found, the election should be re-held with a new election oversight committee.

Article V: Parliament and Constituencies

5.1 House of Commons:

5.2 Senate:

5.3 Constituencies

Article VI: Removal of Members of Parliament, Privy Council, and Senators

6.1 The process for removing a Member of Parliament, Privy Council, or Senator may be initiated when a committee of no less than 21 members not from the same house or council as the accused investigate a complaint and determine that:

6.2 The process for removing a member may also be initiated when:

6.3 The removal of members will be facilitated by a three-tier procedure which operates as follows:

Article VII: General Meetings of the House of Commons and Senate

7.1 The purpose of General Meetings is to provide a forum for members to overview the activities of the nation and solicit feedback from fellow members, to engage in policy-making, to propose amendments to the constitution, or to report on the financial status of the nation.
7.2 General meetings will be facilitated by the Speaker of the House, selected by the Members of Parliament. The Speaker of the House shall be responsible for:

7.3 There shall be a minimum of one (1) general meeting held each month. The date of each subsequent general meeting will be confirmed at the preceding general meeting and will be reiterated to members via email a minimum of two (2) calendar days prior to the meeting.
7.4 General meetings may be called to order by the Prime Minister.
7.5 General meetings are open to be viewed by all citizens and permanent residents of the nation.
7.6 Quorum will first be established by the presence of a simple and clear majority of the members.
7.7 All members are expected to make brief progress reports on their activities at every general meeting. These reports are to be kept in a log.
7.8 Minutes of all general meetings must be recorded and maintained for reference purposes.
7.9 Members must contact the Speaker of the House a minimum of 48 hours before a general meeting to inform them of new business they wish to discuss. The Chairperson will then add the discussion item to the agenda.
7.10 Each member of the organization shall be entitled to one (1) vote at a general meeting except the Speaker of the House who shall only vote in the event of a tie.
7.11 The Speaker of the House presiding over a meeting of members may, with the consent of the majority of members, decide to adjourn these meetings from time to time.

Article VIII: Privy Council Meetings

8.1 The purpose of Privy Council meetings is to provide a forum for the nationís executives to discuss and make decisions on day-to-day matters affecting the organization.
8.2 Privy Council meetings will be facilitated by the Prime Minister. The Prime Minister shall be responsible for:

8.3 There shall be a minimum of one (1) executive meeting held every two (2) weeks. The date of each subsequent executive meeting will be confirmed at the preceding meeting and will be reiterated to executives a minimum of two (2) calendar days prior to the meeting.
8.4 Executive meetings may be called to order by the President or through a petition signed by three (3) executive members.
8.5 Executive meetings are restricted to executive members only. Quorum will be established by the presence of a simple and clear majority of the total executives for the Government.
8.6 Minutes of all executive meetings must be recorded and maintained for reference purposes.
8.7 Executives must notify the Prime Minister a minimum of six (6) hours before an executive meeting to inform them of new business they wish to discuss. The Prime Minister will then add the discussion item to the agenda.
8.8 Each executive member of the organization shall be entitled to one (1) vote at a valid Privy Council meeting.
8.9 Any question at a Privy Council Meeting shall be decided by a show of hands.
8.10 Whenever a vote by show of hands occurs, a declaration by the Prime Minister that the vote has been carried, carried by a particular majority, or failed shall be recorded in the minutes of the meeting.
8.11 In case of an equality of votes at a Privy Council Meeting, the motion will be recorded as having failed.
8.12 The Prime Minister may, with the consent of the majority of executives, decide to adjourn these meetings from time to time.

Article IX: Provincial and Territorial Governments

9.1 The Federal Government is able to override a decision, bill, or motion made by a Provincial or Territorial Government, so long as three-quarters of the House of Commons and Senate vote in favour.
9.2 Provincial and Territorial Governments are unable to contact international governments.
9.3 Provincial and Territorial Governments must hold provincial elections every four years.
9.4 Provincial Premiers and the Prime Minister are to meet with one another at last twice every 12 months.
9.5 Territorial Premiers and the Prime Minister are to meet with one another at last once every 12 months.

Article X: Emergency Meetings

10.1 Emergency meetings can be called for extenuating or unforeseen circumstances that may arise from time to time.
10.2 These meetings must abide by the respective rules outlined in sections VII and VIII depending on the nature of the meeting.
10.3 Notice of these meetings must be provided a minimum of 24 hours in advance.
10.4 Less notice for emergency meetings may be provided at the discretion of the Prime Minister in agreement with a minimum of four (4) general members.

Article XI: Amendments

11.1 The Government may amend or repeal the constitution or certain sections therein.
11.2 Notice of a meeting called to consider such a resolution shall be given as follows:

11.3 Amendments to the constitution require the approval of three-quarters of the Members of Parliament and Senate present at a valid general meeting (a general meeting that has achieved quorum), as well as the approval of 7/9s of the provincial Premiers.

Article XII: Transition

12.1 All outgoing executives are required to transfer all national resources used relative to a particular role over the course of the preceding 5 years to new executives upon leaving the position.
12.2 All outgoing executives are responsible for providing a detailed report to incoming executives that stipulates the status of ongoing projects in their portfolio and evaluations of previous projects and programs that they lead.
12.3 All outgoing and incoming executives will participate in a joint training session to assist with the transition between new executive teams.

Article XIII: Emergency Powers

13.1 In the case of extenuating circumstances, the Prime Minister shall be afforded the ability to act without direction from the Members of Parliament.
13.2 An extenuating circumstance is defined as any instance that may jeopardize the immediate functioning of the Government including but not limited to: executive vacancies, unexpected cancellations, removal from position, or lack of response from members.
13.3 Emergency powers may only be used for such a period of time as is needed to address an extenuating circumstance.
13.4 Members of Parliament have the ability to remove emergency powers where appropriate through submission of a signed petition from at least 25% of Members of Parliament and the Senate.

Appendix A: General Meeting Rules of Order

I. Call to Order
1. The Speaker of the House may call the meeting to order only if a quorum of executives and Members of Parliament is present in person. If a quorum does not exist, the meeting is not qualified to conduct business.
2. The meeting must be open to all applicable Members of Parliament. Members of Parliament must receive notice of the meeting in accordance with the constitution.

II. Review of the Agenda
1. The first draft of the agenda is prepared by the Speaker of the House prior to the meeting. Agenda items should ordinarily appear in the order set forth in these rules of order.
2. The agenda belongs to all Members of Parliament. The agenda may be modified only by a majority vote. This power should only be used when necessary as proper functioning of meetings and the organization requires advance planning.
3. At this point in the agenda, Members of Parliament may add or delete items from the agenda and may change the order of presentation.
4. When possible, changes to the agenda should be done by acquiescence of all Members of Parliament. Formal voting on the agenda is only necessary where it appears to the Speaker of the House that there is a disagreement.

III. Approval of Previous Minutes
1. The minutes need not be read aloud but they should be entered into the Governmentís official minute ledger upon approval by the Members of Parliament.
2. The minutes are prepared an individual appointed by the Members of Parliament to act as recording secretary. Any Members of Parliament may suggest changes to the minutes before the Members of Parliament adopts them. The suggested changes should be set forth in the minutes for the record, and then the Members of Parliament should adopt or reject such changes.
3. Minutes should state precisely each motion considered by the Members of Parliament, and identify the Members of Parliament voting in favour, against, or abstaining, and whether the motion was carried. Minutes need not reflect the comments made except in those instances when the Member of Parliament desires to make his/her comments recorded.
4. When possible, changes to the minutes and adoption of the minutes should be done by the acquiescence of all Members of Parliament. Formal voting on the minutes is only necessary where it appears to the Speaker of the House that there is a disagreement.

IV. Executive Reports
1. Executives may report their findings or recommendations to the Members of Parliament at this point of the agenda.
2. The full report should be presented and then Members of Parliament, in turn, may ask questions or comment. It is not appropriate to make motions or discuss items of business during this portion of the meeting.
10
3. This time should also be used for any presentations to be made to the Members of Parliament.

V. Open Forum
1. It is the custom and practice of The Kingdom and Grand Duchy of The Poland-Lithuania Commonwealth to allow Members of Parliament an open forum to ask questions and speak about their concerns to an executive after a report has been provided.
2. Strict time limitations should be imposed by the Speaker of the House and these limitations must be enforced. Each Member of Parliament should address the Speaker of the House regarding an issue and must speak courteously and to the point.

VI. Old and New Business
1. All items that were tabled during previous meetings must be revisited during the business portion of the agenda occurring after executive reports.
2. The Members of Parliament may vote to postpone consideration of any old business or it may remove any item from consideration.
3. Except in the case of emergency business, all new items of business are heard only after all of the old items have been addressed by the Members of Parliament.
4. All business must be conducted in the form of motions or resolutions adopted by a vote of the Members of Parliament.

VII. Motions and Deliberations
1. When an item of business is to be discussed, the Speaker of the House announces the item to be discussed and opens the floor to discussion.
2. No Member of Parliament may speak until recognized by the Speaker of the House. No Member of Parliament may interrupt the speaker who has the floor.
3. The Speaker of the House may impose reasonable time limitations. All time limitations must be uniformly imposed upon all of the Members of Parliament. The speaker shall be given a two-minute warning before time runs out. By vote of a majority of the Members of Parliament, time limits may be extended.
4. The Speaker of the House is to recognise each Member of Parliament in turn. Discussion shall be limited to the item of business at hand, and the Speaker of the House shall have the authority to take the floor from a speaker who does not limit discussion to the item of business at hand.
5. No Member of Parliament may speak to an issue for a second time until another Member of Parliament has had the opportunity to speak to it for the first time. Likewise, no Member of Parliament may speak to an issue for a third time until another Member of Parliament has had the opportunity to speak to it for a second time.
6. When it appears to the Speaker of the House that all Members of Parliament have had the opportunity to fully discuss the matter at hand, the Speaker of the House should announce that the item of business is ready for a vote.

Template provided by the University of Toronto

RawReport